Drug Shows Promise in Animal Model of Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s With Dementia

New research presented in October at the 6th Neurodegenerative Conditions Research and Development Conference in San Francisco demonstrates the role of the investigational compound IRX4204 in alleviating cognitive decline in animal models of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The presentation entitled “Investigation of the RXR-specific agonist IRX4204 as a Disease Modifying Agent of Alzheimer’s Disease Neuropathology and Cognitive Impairment” was made by lead researcher Giulio Maria Pasinetti, MD, PhD, of the Mount Sinai School of Medicine in New York City.

This microscope image shows blood vessels in the brain of mouse (green) surrounded by amyloid beta peptides (red), a component of the amyloid plaques found in the brains of Alzheimer’s patients. Salk researchers found that these peptides accumulate in the brains of diabetic and aged mice, a finding that may help explain the connection between diabetes and Alzheimer’s. (Credit: Courtesy of the Salk Institute for Biological Studies)

IRX4204 is a retinoid X receptor (RXR) agonist, meaning it stimulates the retinoid receptor in the brain.The data demonstrates attenuation of AD including prevention of plaque deposits associated with cognitive deterioration in an IRX4204-treated mouse model genetically determined to develop AD. IRX4204 also prevents neuropathological features associated with abnormal tau processing, another form of abnormal protein also found in a form of Parkinson’s disease associated with dementia.

“The treatment of AD remains a serious unmet medical need which IRX4204 may be able to address,” Dr. Pasinetti said “Our research show that IRX4204 and other RXR agonists have potential for slowing, and possibly reversing pathology and cognitive deficits in Alzheimer’s disease patients.”

Ongoing translational studies in subjects with Alzheimer’s disease and Parkinson’s disease with dementia are currently being developed.

Alzheimer’s disease currently afflicts more than 5 million Americans and may triple in prevalence to more than 16 million Americans by 2050, according to data from The Alzheimer’s Association.

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