Archives for March 2014

Boost Your Brain with a Little Help from Alzheimer’s Society Canada

(Alzheimer’s Society Canada) Give your brain a boost! Did you know that doing puzzles like crosswords and word searches is a great way to keep your brain active? Maintaining a healthy diet and choosing the right foods is a great way to boost the nutrition that feeds your brain.

Puzzles

 

Crossword

Sudoku

Wordsearch

 

BrainBooster® activities are generously supported by Burnbrae Farms Ltd.

Citation

http://www.alzheimer.ca/en/Living-with-dementia/BrainBooster

© Alzheimer Society of Canada 2011. All rights reserved.

 

From Darwin to Dickens, How History’s Biggest Thinkers Spent Their Days

(Daily Mail) What makes a genius a genius? According to these graphics, it’s good time management.

Using Mason Currey’s book Daily Rituals: How Artists Work – which draws on diaries and letters from the thinkers themselves – designer RJ Andrews has mapped out the comings and goings of some of history’s most important figures, right down to the hour.

From Mozart to Freud and Darwin to Dickens, the waking, working and, in some cases, procrastinating of history’s greatest minds are laid out for scrutiny. From Balzac drinking 50 cups of black coffee a day, to Milton spending hours memorising the Bible, the results are not always as you would expect.

The variation is also surprising, from Freud’s 13 hours of work a day to Mozart’s four, there is not, alas, a simple recipe for success. Even so, people can now mimic the schedule of their intellectual heroes. Who knows, something might rub off…

The graphs are laid out as circles broken up into 24 equal sized segments, each representing an hour
>The different types of activity are identified by colour

The graphs are laid out as circles broken up into 24 equal sized segments, each representing an hour, left, and the different types of activity are identified by colour, right

Gustave Flaubert stuck to this ritual while writing his masterpiece. After a day of quiet contemplation, he would buckle down to work from late evening until the early hours of the morning Gustave Flaubert stuck to this ritual while writing his masterpiece. After a day of quiet contemplation, he would buckle down to work from late evening until the early hours of the morning This was Beethoven's routine for at least five years of his life. He would fit in a full working day before 3pm and would then take the rest of the day to relax This was Beethoven’s routine for at least five years of his life. He would fit in a full working day before 3pm and would then take the rest of the day to relax For the year of 1781 at least, Mozart was a sporadic worker, buckling down for a couple of hours early in the morning and late at night. He spent nearly twice as long each day socialising For the year of 1781 at least, Mozart was a sporadic worker, buckling down for a couple of hours early in the morning and late at night. He spent nearly twice as long each day socialising Thomas Mann would write furiously for three hours every morning before taking it, relatively, easily for the rest of the time Thomas Mann would write furiously for three hours every morning before taking it, relatively, easily for the rest of the time Freud, a renowned workaholic, would be writing or seeing patients for nearly 13 of his 18 waking hours Freud, a renowned workaholic, would be writing or seeing patients for nearly 13 of his 18 waking hours Making his money through teaching, that activity took up his most of Kant's morning and the philosopher always found time for a four hour lunch Making his money through teaching, that activity took up his most of Kant’s morning and the philosopher always found time for a four hour lunch By 7am, Maya Angelou was already in a hotel and ready to work. She would write solidly for seven hours before making her way home to prepare dinner By 7am, Maya Angelou was already in a hotel and ready to work. She would write solidly for seven hours before making her way home to prepare dinner The day started at 4am for John Milton and work was done by midday. The afternoon was for walks and receiving visitors. There was special time put aside in the morning however, for memorising the Bible The day started at 4am for John Milton and work was done by midday. The afternoon was for walks and receiving visitors. There was special time put aside in the morning however, for memorising the Bible Rising at 1am, Balzac would work, almost uninterrupted until 4pm, fuelled by 50 cups of black coffee Rising at 1am, Balzac would work, almost uninterrupted until 4pm, fuelled by 50 cups of black coffee Five hours of work for Dickens was followed by a three hour walk, which often gave him the inspiration for the following day Five hours of work for Dickens was followed by a three hour walk, which often gave him the inspiration for the following day A 12 hour working day for Auden was rewarded by an evening of relaxing with strong vodka martinis A 12 hour working day for Auden was rewarded by an evening of relaxing with strong vodka martinis Darwin was not a man to stick at one thing for too long, chopping and changing between several activities throughout the day Darwin was not a man to stick at one thing for too long, chopping and changing between several activities throughout the day Tchaikovsky only spent four hours a day composing he still completed 11 operas and eight symphonies in his lifetime Tchaikovsky only spent four hours a day composing he still completed 11 operas and eight symphonies in his lifetime Five hours of deep contemplation for Le Corbusier would be followed by three and a half of his employees putting them into action Five hours of deep contemplation for Le Corbusier would be followed by three and a half of his employees putting them into action Asking himself every morning what he wanted to do that day, two four hour stints of hard graft meant Benjamin Franklin would always have something to be proud of when he reviewed at bedtime Asking himself every morning what he wanted to do that day, two four hour stints of hard graft meant Benjamin Franklin would always have something to be proud of when he reviewed at bedtime

 

Caregiver Wellness: Quality Dementia Care Includes Caring for Carers

(I AM-Care) In the past, little attention has been given to the friends, family members and partners who care for their loved one with dementia; but this is changing. Here, we look at some of the ways caregivers can ensure they are themselves cared for and supported, so that in turn they can provide quality care for individuals with dementia.

The Many Challenges of Caregiving

Caregiver Wellness: Quality Dementia Care Includes Caring for CarersFamily members, friends and partners who provide care for a loved one with dementia often bear the burden of caregiving in silence, making it hard for others to know just how demanding it can be and how to provide them with support during times of need. There are many reasons for this. One of them is a perceived or real lack of resources and support networks or organizations. Perhaps these are not readily or physically available, or carers simply don’t have the time, desire or ability to research the many online resources available to them. Whether it is you or someone you know that is providing care, there are resources and programs today that focus entirely upon the wellbeing of the caregiver. You should not feel as if you are on your own.

Caregiving can be quite exhausting from the daily physical demands to the emotional support a caregiver provides. When you’re a caregiver for a family member, you may also find caregiving difficult, because you see your loved one acting in a different way or unable to perform tasks or speak at length as before. Caregiving may also be thrust upon a person unexpectedly and he or she may feel ill prepared or even resentful that their life has changed dramatically – there is nothing wrong with feeling this way, it is perfectly natural, but you should voice these concerns and address them positively rather than keep them inside.

Caregivers can easily become so focused on providing effective, high quality care that they neglect their own needs. They can also experience guilt preventing them form taking a few moments to relax and recover.

Many caregivers give up the social activities they used to enjoy, and lack the energy to do many normal, daily activities. This state can quickly lead to caregiver burn-out.

As people with dementia may require years of intensive care, it is understandable that many caregivers become overly stressed and reach their limits of care. Such chronic stress develops slowly, with many of the first warning signals going unnoticed, but will eventually lead to severe illnesses including burn-out, depression, and other physical conditions.

– IAM-CARE knowledge-base, Stress

Hence, if you are reading this as a caregiver, it is essential to understand your limits, have a daily plan in place for your own self-care and wellbeing, and to build and draw on a network for immediate support at any time – be it medical professionals or other family members and friends.

Developing a Plan for Caregiver Wellness

Whether you’re taking care of a loved one at home or in an assisted facility, your caregiving plan should include your own self-care. Support can range from training and attending workshops, seminars or other classes to joining a support group where you can freely discuss your concerns and even your daily experiences. If you would like to learn more about starting your dementia care plan, read A Toolkit for Developing a Dementia Care Plan.

Below is a series of tips to assist you in self-care and staying healthy and well.

1. Taking Breaks

The easiest item to include in your caregiving plan, and perhaps the most profoundly helpful, is a regular break. Caregivers often use breaks to catch up on other tasks, like household chores or financial management. However, this can be counterproductive – it is more important to do something you enjoy, whether it is going out for coffee or a meal, indulging in a hobby or favorite pastime, going for a walk or exercising. Your break does not have to be long – a 15-minute walk for some fresh air will help you clear your mind and return refreshed.

One caregiver, Ann Wiltshire, told the Alzheimer’s Society: “It’s really important to try and get some time on your own, for yourself. I go and read a book upstairs, or I take the dog out. You need that little space.”

2. Eating Healthily, Exercising and Getting Enough Sleep

Exercise, healthy eating, drinking enough water and sleep well all are essential. Try to factor in at least a little light exercise – such as walking a dog if you have one – into one of your daily breaks. Your caregiving responsibilities may include some physical exertion, but a walk outside is different – it is less about physical strain, and more about relaxation and a change of scenery.

Eating healthily, exercising and sleep is important for quality caregivingTry not to rely on caffeine excessively during the day to maintain your energy levels, as this may affect your sleep and lead to anxiety, stress and depression. Try not to drink coffee after midday, and instead turn to energizing foods such as yogurt, nuts and seeds, beans and greens. Later in the day, foods that help when unwinding before sleep include cherries, bananas, toast, oatmeal, or calming teas such as chamomile.

Be sure to see a doctor regularly to check up on your own health. You may also want to talk with a counselor if you feel depressed or overwhelmed by your role as a caregiver.

Doing something fun and relaxing is essential to your wellbeing. Trust in another family member to provide care while you take an evening or a few days off to spend time by yourself or with your friends, or to catch up on your reading or favorite pastime.

3. Emotional Support

Caregiving is far more emotionally draining than most caregivers first realize. You can easily feel a sense of satisfaction and fulfillment when helping the person, but feelings of guilt, unhappiness, anger, resentment and grief are also common. Seek advice and counsel, whether it is from a support group of family and friends, or by joining a dementia or Alzheimer’s organization – you can find a list of these in Information Resources for People with Dementia.

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Alzheimer’s Disease Resources for Patients and Caregivers

(Massachusetts Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center) The national Alzheimer’s Association is the premier source of information for advocacy, research information, support programs and education for consumers. The national office of the Association is based in Chicago, IL, and its main contact number is 312-335-8700. Caregivers may also ‘meet’ other caregivers, learn about critical topics and connect with social workers via the Care Crossroads website of the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America.

The federal National Institute on Aging and its Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center (ADEAR) offers the latest news and publications on the diagnosis, treatment, care and research related to dementia, in addition to a 24-hour toll-free hotline (1-800-438-4380) for information, support and referrals, and automatic email alerts for the public. The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ www.alzheimers.gov is also a great website ‘for the people helping people with Alzheimer’s’.

For individuals who wish to learn more about the range of national clinical trials available for study participation, please visit the free registry available on the Alzheimer’s Disease Cooperative Study website, the Alzheimer’s Association TrialMatch site, ResearchMatch and the National Institute on Aging’s Alzheimer’s Disease Education and Referral Center (ADEAR).

The Alzheimer Research Forum is an open-access community of professional science writers, editors and Information-Technology experts that collaborate to provide the latest scientific news, discussion forums and links to useful research databases for the public. The Nature Publishing Group has also debuted a Spotlight on Alzheimer’s Disease website that provides a variety of perspectives on the disease.

Individuals who are not native speakers of English may wish to visit Medline Plus, a service of the National Institutes on Health, which currently provides high-quality health information in more than 40 languages on approximately 250 health topics.

A comprehensive list of other information, caregiver and support organizations may be found on the HBO: The Alzheimer’s Project’s Get Help page.

A list of health topics for older adults, including health videos and a brief overview of the federal government’s health insurance information for older individuals (Medicare), is available at http://nihseniorhealth.gov/index.html. This site was developed by the National Institute on Aging and the National Library of Medicine of the National Institutes of Health.

A wonderful ‘tool’ to support individuals with dementia and their caregivers through creative engagement is the Timeslips Creative Storytelling Project. It was developed by educator, scholar and artist, Anne Bastings, PhD, to stimulate the imagination of people with memory problems, inspire loved ones to see beyond loss to recognize their strengths, and improve the quality of life for all caregivers.

International Focus

The Alzheimer’s Disease International (ADI) Organisation is an umbrella organization of more than 70 international Alzheimer associations that have official relations with the World Health Organization. Among its diverse activities, it hosts an international conference for professionals and consumers in conjunction with an ADI member organization each year. Check out the I AM-Care  platform for more information on caregiving for individuals with dementia.

Citation

http://madrc.mgh.harvard.edu/resources-patients-caregivers

© Massachusetts General Hospital, All Rights Reserved

 

American Heart Association Recommendations for Physical Activity in Adults

(American Heart Association) Being physically active is important to prevent heart disease and stroke, the nation’s No. 1 and No. 4 killers. To improve overall cardiovascular health, we suggest at least 150 minutes per week of moderate exercise or 75 minutes per week of vigorous exercise (or a combination of moderate and vigorous activity). Thirty minutes a day, five times a week is an easy goal to remember. You will also experience benefits even if you divide your time into two or three segments of 10 to 15 minutes per day.
For people who would benefit from lowering their blood pressure or cholesterol, we recommend 40 minutes of aerobic exercise of moderate to vigorous intensity three to four times a week to lower the risk for heart attack and stroke.

Physical activity is anything that makes you move your body and burn calories, such as climbing stairs or playing sports. Aerobic exercises benefit your heart, and include walking, jogging, swimming or biking. Strength and stretching exercises are best for overall stamina and flexibility.

The simplest, positive change you can make to effectively improve your heart health is to start walking. It’s enjoyable, free, easy, social and great exercise. A walking program is flexible and boasts high success rates because people can stick with it. It’s easy for walking to become a regular and satisfying part of life.

AHA RecommendationFor Overall Cardiovascular Health:

  • At least 30 minutes of moderate-intensity aerobic activity at least 5 days per week for a total of 150OR
  • At least 25 minutes of vigorous aerobic activity at least 3 days per week for a total of 75 minutes; or a combination of moderate- and vigorous-intensity aerobic activityAND
  • Moderate- to high-intensity muscle-strengthening activity at least 2 days per week for additional health benefits.

For Lowering Blood Pressure and Cholesterol

  • An average 40 minutes of moderate- to vigorous-intensity aerobic activity 3 or 4 times per week

 

What if I can’t make it to the time goal?

Something is always better than nothing! And everyone has to start somewhere. Even if you’ve been sedentary for years, today is the day you can begin to make healthy changes in your life. If you don’t think you’ll make it for 30 or 40 minutes, set a reachable goal for today. You can work up toward your overall goal by increasing your time as you get stronger. Don’t let all-or-nothing thinking rob you of doing what you can every day.

Citation

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/American-Heart-Association-Recommendations-for-Physical-Activity-in-Adults_UCM_307976_Article.jsp

©2014 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

5 Steps to Loving Exercise … Or At Least Not Hating It

(American Heart Association) We all know the benefits of regular physical activity – increased energy, better cardiovascular health, reducing the risk of heart disease and stroke and looking more svelte.

But about 80 percent of Americans don’t make exercise a regular habit, and, according to a recent American Heart Association website survey, 14 percent say they don’t like exercise.

So how do you overcome an exercise aversion? Mercedes Carnethon, Ph.D., assistant professor of preventive medicine at Northwestern University’s Feinberg School of Medicine, has some tips to help you incorporate exercise into your life – and maybe even learn to like it.

  1. Exercise That Suits You
    Find an exercise that best fits your personality, Dr. Carnethon said. If you are social person, do something that engages you socially – take a group exercise class, join a kickball team or walk with a group of friends. Or, if you prefer having time alone, walking or jogging solo might be a better fit for you.MyWalkingClub.org is the perfect way to connect with others who share your goals, lifestyles, schedules and hobbies.Try some of these ideas to help you get moving – at home, at work or at play.
  2. Make it a Habit
    It takes about three weeks for something to become a habit, so give yourself the time to create a regular routine. One way is to try to exercise around the same time each day.
    “Exercise can become addictive in a positive way,” said Dr. Carnethon, who is also an American Heart Association volunteer. “Once it becomes a habit, you’ll notice when you aren’t doing something.”
  3. Build Exercise Into Your Lifestyle
    Be honest with yourself. If you don’t live close to a gym, it’s not going to become a habit for you. Likewise, if you are not a morning person, don’t plan on somehow getting up at the crack of dawn to make a boot camp class.“The key is building activity into your lifestyle so it is not disruptive,” Dr. Carnethon said.There are many ways to fit exercise into your life, and it doesn’t mean you have to make a big financial investment.You can borrow exercise videos from the library or DVR an exercise program. Do weight or resistance training with items around your home (for example, use canned goods as light weights).  Walking is great option, as well. The only investment is a good pair of shoes.
  4. Do Bouts of Exercise
    It’s OK to break up your physical activity into smaller segments, Dr. Carnethon said. The American Heart Association recommends 30 minutes a day of exercise most days, but if that sounds overwhelming, try three 10-minute workout sessions.You could do a quick calisthenics routine when you wake up, take a brief walk after lunch at work and, if you commute with public transportation, get off a stop earlier and walk the rest of the way.
  5. Keep Going
    If you miss a day or a workout, don’t worry about it. Everybody struggles once in a while. Just make sure you get back at it the next day.“It doesn’t take too long to get back on track,” Dr. Carnethon said. “It’s easy to make something a habit again. You will see same benefits before. Any little bit you can fit in will show benefits.”
Citation

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/GettingActive/5-Steps-to-Loving-Exercise-Or-At-Least-Not-Hating-It_UCM_445812_Article.jsp

©2014 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

From the Couch to the Pavement – A Plan to Get You Moving

(American Heart Association) Get Moving — What are you waiting for?

We all know exercise is good for us, but about 80 percent of Americans don’t get the physical activity they need. What steps have you taken to live a more active life? Are you sitting on the couch waiting for someone to motivate you to get up?  Do you tell yourself, “Tomorrow I’m going to get healthy”? Or is it more like, “I wish I could fit into the clothes I love, but I don’t know to make that happen?” We’ve all heard “It’s never too late!” or “Anyone can do it.” And guess what? It’s true! If you don’t know where to start, don’t know how to fit in fitness or feel overwhelmed with life’s daily tasks, take heart! We’re here to help you make a plan to change your habits, and improve your health, your heart and your waistline.

People give many reasons for not making their health a priority. Do any of these excuses sound like things you’d say?

Addressing Your Obstacles

  • “I’m so busy. I just don’t have time!” Many Americans live with a packed schedule. Business is a trap, but you can make your health a priority over life’s other demands. Even our nation’s president sets aside time to exercise! You don’t have to do your whole workout all at once. Get up 30 minutes earlier in the morning to take a brisk walk, or tack on an extra 30 minutes in the afternoon or evening to raise your heart rate with strength training. You can exercise in two or three 10-15 minute blocks and still benefit! Try our top 10 tips to get more exercise!
  • “I can’t afford a gym membership.” Walking is free! If it’s cold or rainy, head to one of the many shopping malls that open their doors early for walkers and joggers. Sometimes gyms run specials. Watch for these at the end of the year. Or consider buying some workout DVDs. Whatever you choose, find a way to start moving! Get started with these tips for long-term success.
  • “I got bored with my workout routine.” Try something new! There are so many ways to get active. Try tennis with some friends, soccer with your kids or even just switching from yoga to pilates. Your body will respond to the change, and you might notice firmer muscles or extra pounds melting off. Regardless, variety helps you stay more invested in living an active life. Here are some easy tips to get active.
  • “I feel too tired after a workout.” Chronic fatigue with exertion can signal a problem, but if your healthcare provider clears you for exercise, you may just need to pace yourself better. Walk before trying to jog. You may want to consider other energy-boosting plans, too.
    • Are you pacing yourself and keeping your heart rate at the right level?
    • Are you getting enough sleep at night?
    • Are you eating food that fuels your body, or are you eating too much food that your body can’t use?If you’re taking in large amounts of sugar, white flour, simple carbohydrates or overly processed foods, then you may experience periods of “highs and lows.” During these times, you may feel very tired and sluggish. To learn more about blood sugar and energy in our diabetes prevention and treatment section.
  • “I don’t like working out alone.” This is a common complaint that’s easy to fix. Find a buddy! Get a walking partner by joining an AHA Walking Club, introduce yourself to someone at the gym, join a team or a walking group, find a neighbor to walk with or exercise with your family. When you exercise in pairs, it’s easier to hold each other accountable – especially on those cold, rainy days! You can also listen to audiobooks or your favorite music on days when no one is available to join you.
  • “I’m too young” or “I’m too old.” Neither excuse is true. When you’re in your 20s and 30s, it’s important to regulate your body’s metabolism, strengthen your heart and prevent diseases. When you’re older, exercise plays a vital role in stamina and strength. Several studies document how regular exercise improves quality of life during the aging process. So if you’re exercising when you’re in your 80s, you just might feel like you’re in your 70s! Learn more about preventing heart disease at any age.
  • “I’m new to exercise,” or “I’m overweight and I don’t know where to start.” Is this you? It’s easy to use these excuses as mental roadblocks to success. Don’t let them stop you. Everyone needs to start somewhere.

Determine Your Starting Place
Here are some steps to help get you started.

  • Visit your healthcare provider and get a baseline health screening.
  • Assess yourself. Realistically, what can you do?There’s no good excuse for denying yourself a healthier life!
    • Can you walk a mile? How long does it take you?
    • Can you continue to walk at a brisk pace for 20 minutes? For 30 minutes?
    • Can you swim one lap?
    • How many push-ups can you do?
    • Can you bend down and touch your toes?Your starting point is always based on what you can do! Try tracking your activity and look at it as a place to start and build up more as you are able. Use our online activity tracker or a printable activity tracker.
  • Add on gradually. Gradually increase your workouts by setting goals. If you can walk 1 ½ miles in 30 minutes, your pace is three miles an hour. You can train your heart to handle a faster-paced walk using intervals. For example, every five minutes, try pushing yourself to walk one minute at a faster pace. Before you know it, the faster pace will be your new normal. The American Heart Association recommends 30 minutes of cardiovascular exercise every day (brisk walking, for example). Cardio exercise burns calories and benefits your heart and lungs. Strength training with weights or resistance bands is also recommended two to three times a week. Strength training builds muscle which, in turn, burns fat and helps your muscles and joints stay healthy for a long, physically active life. A combination of these two types of exercise is important for good health.
  • Many reliable resources are available to help you get started. Books, DVDs, podcasts and personal trainers are a few examples.
    Are you still sitting on the couch? Put on your shoes and move your body! Turn on your favorite music and dance. Today is the day to start on the road to better health. Remember, it’s OK to start slowly and build up to your goal.
Citation

This content was last reviewed on 03/22/2013.

http://www.heart.org/HEARTORG/GettingHealthy/PhysicalActivity/GettingActive/From-the-Couch-to-the-Pavement—A-Plan-to-Get-You-Moving_UCM_425106_Article.jsp

©2014 American Heart Association, Inc. All rights reserved.

 

Alzheimer’s Disease Hits Women Hardest

(Alz Research Forum) The burden of Alzheimer’s disease falls disproportionately on women, according to the Alzheimer’s Association’s annual Facts and Figures report released on March 19. Women over 65 are twice as likely as men to develop the disease, and make up two-thirds of those who currently have it. In fact, women’s risk of developing Alzheimer’s runs about double that of breast cancer, the Association noted in a press release.

Women are also about 2.5 times more likely than men to provide full-time care for someone with Alzheimer’s, and are more likely to have to quit work or cut back on their hours to do so, increasing the financial burden on affected families. Previous studies have estimated the direct medical costs from Alzheimer’s disease at more than $200 billion annually in the United States; adding the costs from unpaid caregiving roughly doubles that figure (see Mar 2012 news story).

The report comes as other researchers report evidence to support a view long held in the field, namely that Alzheimer’s causes more deaths than health records suggest. In many cases, doctors record heart or respiratory failure or other causes on death certificates but not the fatal neurodegeneration that can precipitate such systemic failures (see Dec 2008 news story). In the March 25 Neurology, researchers led by Bryan James at the Rush Alzheimer’s Disease Center, Chicago, reported that over an eight-year period, about one-third of the deaths in a cohort of older adults could be attributed to Alzheimer’s. T

his data was collected from more than 2,500 participants in the Rush Memory and Aging Project and the Religious Orders Study. By projecting it out to the population at large, the authors estimated that Alzheimer’s could account for more than half a million deaths a year in the United States in people older than 75. This is six times higher than the number of AD deaths reported on death certificates. If correct, this would make AD the third-leading cause of death after heart disease and cancer.

The authors note that their cohort may not represent the general population, being better-educated and somewhat healthier overall. Nonetheless, the data suggest that Alzheimer’s deaths are extremely underreported, in agreement with previous studies (see Olichney et al., 1995Ganguli and Rodriguez, 1999).

Citation

Madolyn Bowman Rogers

http://www.alzforum.org/news/research-news/alzheimers-disease-hits-women-hardest

Copyright © 1996–2014 Biomedical Research Forum, LLC. All Rights Reserved.